Pepe and Lupita and the Great Yawn Jar

Pepe and Lupita and the Great Yawn Jar

$10.95

Sandy Allbee Lacy was born and raised in Alamosa, Colorado, in the high mountain San Luis Valley. She is a wife, mother, teacher, and writer whose works also include a book of personal poetry titled Insight Out. A suspense novel, Juggernaut, and a cozy mystery, Hair Today; Gone Tomorrow, are in progress.

About the Illustrator

Born and raised in the rainforests near the Oregon coast, Garren Schrom presently resides near the Rocky Mountains in Highlands Ranch, Colorado. Garren has shown in numerous regional and national watercolor shows, including the Foothills Celebrating the Art of Clean Air Exhibition, Kansas Watercolor Society shows, and the Rocky Mountain National Watercolor Exhibition. Among the numerous awards the artist has received are Lone Tree, Best of Show; Images of Parker, Best of Show (2003 and 2005); the Strathmore Artistic Excellence Award; the Kansas Watercolor Society Patron Purchase Award; and the Niagara Frontier Watercolor Society’s M. Martin Award. Garren has also had a reproduction of one of her paintings included in the book Splash 3, and reproductions and an article in America Artist magazine.

SKU: 9781604949230 Category:

Description

When Pepe and Lupita are playing one late summer afternoon, trying to catch Grandpa’s Great Yawns in a glass canning jar, they have no idea that the fruits of their game will come to be the solution to a major problem for the family—especially for Mama—come All Souls Day, when the soul of Grandma Isabella comes to visit their family.

Pepe and Lupita are the eldest of the six (soon to be seven) children of Maria Estela and Juan Miguel Lujan y Mendoza. Their grandfather, Esteban Mendoza, lives with this family in San Luis, Colorado, the oldest village in the state. Their ancestors came to the San Luis Valley in south-central Colorado in the late 1600s. Their descendants have stayed there ever since.

The ancestors brought with them both the Catholic faith of the conquering Spaniards and the indigenous customs of their Native American heritage, among which are All Saints Day and All Souls Day (Dia de los Muertos), celebrated the first and second of November, respectively, each year.