Every writer should use an editor

Every writer should use an editor

It’s been said before, it’s time to say it again: Every writer should use a professional editor before the final publication of a book.

In a recent guest post called “Why Do I Need an Editor” on BadRedHead Media, Janie Goltz explains why writers do not see their own mistakes. As a professional writer and editor, Goltz has a good perspective on writing and publishing. According to Goltz, there are three different kinds of editing and the costs of an editing job range from low to high.

When you write something, it has the potential to last for a long time. Therefore, it’s best to present yourself and your work in a favorable light when you are published. Poor grammar may be excusable in text or Facebook messages, but when a possible new employer is looking you up on the Internet, it’s not such a good thing.

You may have a scintillating plot and a powerful story, but if there are jarring misspellings and confusing passages, your readers will not bother with your book. The competition is too steep for any author to succeed with mediocre writing.

The difference between a casual writer and a professional writer in most cases is that the professional rewrites drafts with the help of an editor. Of course, you can rewrite your own work without paying for the expense of an editor, but there comes a point when you cannot see your own mistakes.

You can propel your writing into the “superior” class simply by hiring an editor and carefully revising every red lettered comment that is given. There may be a few times when you will absolutely not want to make a change, but getting a professional to critique your work will be invaluable for your writing.

By |2016-08-01T08:58:19+00:00November 19, 2013|Writing|Comments Off on Every writer should use an editor

About the Author:

Grael Norton is Wheatmark's Director of Marketing, specializing in helping writers design the business of selling their books. His book, The Author's Guide to Choosing a Publishing Service is currently available for free at http://authors.guide.